Learn To Play Guitar Solos For Beginners

All right, we’ve arrived at the final step in our whirlwind guitar lesson. This time, it’s…learning to play guitar solos for beginners.

Whaaaattt??? Dude, I just figured out how to play a chord – isn’t it too early to start learning how to shred? I mean, I have no idea how to play a guitar solo!

Well, I’m including this for the same reason that I want you to start playing songs right away, namely: it’s fun as hell.

Okay, so you’re not going to be channeling Eddie Van Halen, or Andres Segovia, or John Mayer today, but here’s the thing about soloing on guitar:

1) For most styles, it’s actually something you make up as you go along – you’re improvising
2) In a way, you really can’t make a mistake! Yup, if you don’t believe it, listen to Sonic Youth, or Living Colour, or My Bloody Valentine. What you’ll probably pick up right away is that completely insane noise can be just as valid as the most technically accurate, exquisitely played melody

Now maybe your heroes, the players you want to be like, are the types of people who went to music school and rip through b9#13 arpeggios at warp speed, and maybe you suspect that you’ll need years of obsessive practice before you’re able to approach their abilities.

You suspect correctly, but even if that’s where you eventually want to go, it’s important to start with this firmly in mind: guitar soloing is for everyone, even you, and you can have fun and express yourself, at least a little, right away.

How? Well, let’s look at that chord diagram that I showed you before – here it is again:

guitar chords for beginners

So here’s the secret to getting started with soloing right now:

When someone else is playing a chord, let’s say, G, you can play any combination of the notes that make up that chord and it’ll sound good.

In other words, press a finger down wherever there’s a black dot on that diagram and then pluck the string with your other hand (or play any of the three open strings). You’re soloing!

Now obviously there’s way more to it than this, but remember, what we’re trying to do is focus on the absolute essentials of learning to play guitar, so just try practicing this for a while. If you can’t find someone else to play the G chord for you, try searching YouTube for “backing track in G” videos – usually these will be recordings of other instruments, but the principle remains the same. Here’s a sample for you to check out:

Good times, right? Okay, I know that when you first start doing this, it might sound kind of silly. But I promise you that if you keep at it for even half an hour, it’s going to start sinking in just a tiny bit and you’ll hear some sounds that you like.

Oh, and if you have an electric guitar? Turn it up. Tons of classic rock guitar solos are just a few notes, played at ungodly volume. If you play an E note over an E chord, loud enough to get the neighbors to call the cops, you’re going to feel like Neil Young in no time.

Guitar solos for beginners? Check.
So what’s the final step? Click here for the last essential secret to learning how to play guitar, and to check out what lies on the road ahead…